Complete Guide to Kettlebell Training from Beginner to Advanced

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I guess for many people Kettlebell Training may be how you first discovered me. I was one of the first to introduce Kettlebell Classes into London and still teach Kettlebells to this day.

Kettlebells are a very powerful tool that can be extremely effective but they can also be hugely ineffective if abused.

In today’s post I’m going to lay out exactly how you should approach Kettlebell Training to get the most benefits from it while minimising injury at the same time.

Here’s a simple infographic to get you started:

Guide to Kettlebell Training

Copy, Share or Add this Infographic to your Website, just link back to this page!

History of Kettlebells

If you have not seen or heard of kettlebells then allow me to give you a very quick overview.

A kettlebell is a solid heavy ball with an offset handle just large enough to place your hand through. The origins of the kettlebell are a little vague but they can be traced back hundreds of years. Weights with handles were often used during fitness challenges for both carrying and throwing events and it’s believed that the kettlebell simply evolved from here.

Later the Kettlebell was adopted by the Soviet forces for training their soldiers and then finally gained popularity in the west.

Benefits of Kettlebell Training

Kettlebells are a tool just like any other piece of fitness equipment, they can be used correctly or they can be used incorrectly. The kettlebell is pulled, pushed, and swung in a dynamic nature causing excessive demands on the body.

Here are some of the benefits:

  • Offset Handle enables swinging of the kettlebell
  • Kettlebell Swinging increases the load and so increases the demands required to decelerate the kettlebell
  • Swinging increases the demand on stabilisation muscles as they work harder to keep joints aligned
  • Swinging the Kettlebell increases Lunge and Heart Capacity as multi-joint movements require more oxygen
  • Kettlebell Swinging requires no movement of the feet meaning a Full Body workout requiring little workout space
  • Kettlebell Exercises involve full body movements connecting head to toe and improving core integration
  • Regular Kettlebell Training increases ligaments and soft tissue strength due to the dynamic movements

Selecting the Correct Kettlebell

Since Kettlebells have become more popular in gyms and with personal trainers more and more companies have started selling them. Be careful! Not all kettlebells are created equal. Here’s a quick guide to buying your kettlebell:

Competition KettlebellsCompetition Kettlebell

These kettlebells have a more square handle and the body of the kettlebell stays the same size regardless of the weight. These bells are designed for competition and the narrow handle enables minimum movement of the hand inside the handle.  These kettlebells are great for single handed exercises but for the beginner they offer little room to hold the kettlebell with two hands.

Cast Iron KettlebellsCast Iron Kettlebell

These are my kettlebell of choice, they have a slightly rounded handle and a solid cast iron ball. The kettlebell should be smoothly shaped and have no sharp corners. The space between the handle and the ball should be just large enough to push a horizontal closed fist through but not so large that you can push a vertical closed fist through.

Types of Kettlebells to Avoid

  1. Anything that is made of vinyl, I haven’t seen a good one yet!
  2. Any Kettlebell with a flat plastic or rubber foot attached to the bottom
  3. Kettlebells with very large handles, use the fist test as detailed above
  4. All Kettlebells that have sharp corners, lines or edges

Selecting the correct kettlebell is vital as you will find out when you start training. Badly designed kettlebells will destroy your wrists, band up your forearms and seriously reduce the pleasure of your training.

What Kettlebell Weight to Use

Kettlebells traditionally come in a number of different weights, here’s my guide to what weight to use:

  • 8kg or 17lbs – Starting Weight for Women, I’ve never trained a women who shouldn’t start here. Remember this isn’t Dumbbell training!
  • 12kg or 26lbs – Unconditioned Men start here and Women advance to here very quickly
  • 16kg or 36lbs (Original Weight) – Average Conditioned Men start here, and many women progress to this weight within 6-12 months
  • 20kg or 44lbs – A natural progression for men and some women use this for Swings
  • 24kg or 52lbs – (Original Weight) – This is the goal for men and a nice demanding weight for most exercises.
  • 28kg or 61lbs – It’s a big leap from 24kg to 32kg so this can help bridge the gap.
  • 32kg or 70lbs – (Original Weight) – I like this weight for Swings and Turkish Get Ups

Due to the increased popularity of kettlebell training many manufacturers have started to produce smaller and interim weight sizes. Stick to the weights above and I’m sure you will find you don’t need any other sizes.

Most men can survive with just a 16kg kettlebell for some time and most women can benefit from an 8kg and a 12kg.

Where to Start – Level 1 (Stabilisation)

Most people jump in and start with kettlebell exercises that are way too advanced for them and end up getting injured or developing bad habits. As with everything in life we need to start off with the basics and build a strong foundation.

The human body is built from Stabilising Muscles and Prime Mover muscles.

Our stabiliser muscles are smaller and weaker but better at endurance work, they stabiliser the joints enabling a strong platform for the larger muscles to work from. The Prime Mover muscles are larger muscles and they provide the large movements, the quads are a great example.

Due to our current sitting lifestyles and the advent of weight training machines most of us have very badly conditioned stabiliser muscles meaning that our big muscles work but on a very shaky foundation.

So, in order to build a solid foundation and avoid injury we need to work on the stabiliser muscles first.

Here are 2 kettlebell exercises that every one should master before moving on:

# 1 – Turkish Get Up

The Turkish Get Up is a full body exercise that takes you through most of the fundamental movement patterns conditioning your core and stabiliser muscles in the process. The Turkish Get Up is probably one of the best all over body stabilisation exercises and has been around for hundreds of years.

It is believed that the Greeks would not train a boy with weights until he could get up from the floor with a weight held above his head. This concept mirrors my philosophy that we should not be training with any resistance until we have a strong enough stabilisation system to deal with it.

The Turkish Get Up involves 7 stages:

  • From the Fetal position roll onto your back and help the bell into the straight arm position. Don’t take your eyes off the bell
  • Bend the leg on the same side as the bell and place the opposite arm out at 45 degrees
  • Crush the handle as you sit up along the line of your arm, first to elbow and then to hand. Keep the kettlebell arm down and in its socket and the opposite shoulder away from the ear
  • Push from the heel of the bent leg and drive your hips in the air and into full hip extension. There should be a straight line from bell to bottom hand
  • Sweep the straight leg back and through to a half kneeling position
  • Taking the hand off the floor straighten the body and take the eyes off the bell and look forwards
  • Drive from the front heel and stand. Steady yourself and then reverse the movement

Here’s a video of the Turkish Get Up in Action:

# 2 – Single Leg Deadlift

The Single Leg Deadlift teaches you to hinge at your hips while maintaining a solid core and shoulder structure. Again you are teaching your body here how to stabilise during movement. If you can’t handle this movement then you certainly won’t be able to handle the kettlebell when it’s swinging at speed.

Here are my tips on the Single Leg Deadlift:

  • Maintain a solid grip with the shoulder and back in alignment at all times
  • Keep a soft knee on the standing leg and weight on the heel
  • Instigate the movement by taking the one leg backwards
  • Don’t over rotate the rear leg outwards and descend slowly with control
  • NEVER ARCH YOUR LOWER BACK
  • Only go as deep as your flexibility will allow

This is a tricky exercise and many people find they bend at their lower back trying to get the kettlebell to the floor, DON’T DO THIS. If your hamstrings will only allow you to get to 12 inches from the floor, that’s fine just stop and return to the start position.

Here’s a Video of the Single Leg Deadlift in Action:

Stabilisation Workout Program

Now you have an understanding of the two fundamental kettlebell exercises that I recommend for improving the stabilising muscles, lets put them together into a monthly workout program.

Week 1 – Practice Week

  • Monday: Turkish Get Up  (No Kettlebell) – 10 reps, 5 each side
  • Tuesday: Single Leg Deadlift (No Kettlebell) – 5 reps each side x 2 sets
  • Wednesday: Turkish Get Up (No Kettlebell) – 5 reps each side x 2 sets
  • Thursday: Single Leg Deadlift (No Kettlebell) – 5 reps each side x 2 sets
  • Friday: Turkish Get Up (Holding Glass Water) – 5 reps each side x 2 sets
  • Saturday: Single Leg Deadlift (No Kettlebell) – 5 reps x 3 sets
  • Sunday: Rest

Week 2 – Adding Load

  • Monday: Turkish Get Up  (Holding Glass of Water) - 5 reps each side x 3 sets
  • Tuesday: Single Leg Deadlift (With Kettlebell) – 5 reps each side x 2 sets
  • Wednesday: Turkish Get Up (Holding Glass of Water) – 8 reps each side x 2 sets
  • Thursday: Single Leg Deadlift (With Kettlebell) – 8 reps each side x 2 sets
  • Friday: Turkish Get Up (With Kettlebell) – 3 reps each side
  • Saturday: Rest
  • Sunday: Rest

Week 3 – Combining Exercises

  • Monday: Turkish Get Up  (With Kettlebell) – 5 reps each side
  • Tuesday: Single Leg Deadlift (With Kettlebell) – 5 reps each side x 3 sets
  • Wednesday: Rest
  • Thursday: Single Leg Deadlift (With Kettlebell) – 5 reps each side x 2 sets
  • Follow With:Turkish Get Up (With Kettlebell) – 3 reps each side
  • Friday: Rest
  • Saturday:Single Leg Deadlift (With Kettlebell) – 8 reps each side x 2 sets
  • Follow With: Turkish Get Up (With Kettlebell) – 5 reps each side
  • Sunday: Rest

Week 4 – Progressing

  • Monday:Single Leg Deadlift (With Kettlebell) – 5 reps each side x 3 sets
  • Follow With: Turkish Get Up (With Kettlebell) – 3 reps each side x 2 sets
  • Tuesday: Rest
  • Wednesday: Single Leg Deadlift (With Kettlebell) – 5 reps each side x 3 sets
  • Follow With:Turkish Get Up (With Kettlebell) – 5 reps each side x 2 sets
  • Thursday: Rest
  • Friday:Single Leg Deadlift (With Kettlebell) – 5 reps each side x 3 sets
  • Follow With:Turkish Get Up (With Kettlebell) – 3 reps each side x 3 sets
  • Saturday: Rest
  • Sunday: Rest

The objective of the above 4 week program is to build skill and confidence with the movements. THE MOVEMENTS SHOULD BE CHALLENGING BUT NOT HARD! The hard workouts come later. Take your time, be consistent and build beautiful movement patterns. You will really benefit from this in the long run. Don’t cut corners or think you are too cool for these short workouts, get great at the finer details.

If you find the above workout plan too challenging then continue to repeat each week until you feel you are ready to move on.

Dynamic Kettlebell Training – Level 2

You should now have bomb proofed your body ready for more dynamic kettlebell exercises. Here is where you start to work a little harder and really feel the benefits of the ballistic movements of the kettlebell.

Again I have to warn you. Just as quickly as a kettlebell can improve your body it can undo it just as fast. If you haven’t mastered the Single Leg Deadlift or the Turkish Get Up then you need to do that first!

Here are the 3 Fundamental Kettlebell Exercises that take advantage of the fundamental movement patterns that we are all designed to use anatomically…

# 1 – Kettlebell Swing

The first and by far the most characteristic kettlebell exercise is the Swing. The Swing involves the deadlift pattern or hinging at the hips. During this exercise you will activate almost every muscle in your body and in particular the posterior chain or back line of the body.

Kettlebell Swings are highly effective at raising your heart rate, improving your posture and building strength endurance.

Here are my tips for the Swing:

  • Hinge at the hips NOT the lower back
  • Stand Tall and Squeeze your Abs & Buttocks
  • Load the heels NOT the toes
  • Maintain a Flat Back through the exercise
  • Lift the Chest and keep the Shoulders in their sockets
  • Ensure the shins track the line of the feet
  • Breathe OUT on the way down and IN on the way up

Here’s a Video Tutorial of the Kettlebell Swing (taken from my GB Challenge Series)

I would recommend that you start with the two handed Swing first and then progress to the one handed swing later. The movement principles are exactly the same between the two exercise you just hold the kettlebell with both hands rather than one.

A Note about Hamstring Length

As you enter the bottom of the Swing and your pelvis rotates forwards your hamstrings will be on stretch.  If you have tight hamstrings due to Core Activation discrepancies, injuries or lack of movement skills, then your lower back will start to arch to assist you in the depth of the swing.

It is VERY IMPORTANT that you do not let this happen. You must adjust the depth of your Swing so that your Hamstrings DO NOT over stretch at the bottom portion of the swing. If you have problems touching your toes or know that you have tight hamstrings when you lean forward then DO NOT swing too deep or far between your legs. Keep your swings shallow!

# 2 – Kettlebell Squat

We all know that the Squat is an incredible and extremely natural movement pattern.  Like the Swing it uses most muscles in the body and helps up sit down and stand up from a chair, toilet etc. Once you have mastered the Bodyweight Squat then you can perform a Kettlebell Squat.

There are 2 basic holding positions for the Squat, either with both hands or with just one hand. If you hold the Kettlebell with just one hand then you load one side of the body encouraging additional stabilisation to centralise the movement.

Here are my tips for the Kettlebell Squat:

  • Load the heels and the back of the body
  • Ensure Shins align with the line of the feet
  • Sit the hips back as if in Ski Boots
  • Keep your Chest Up as you hold the Kettlebell
  • Keep your Shoulders back and Back Muscles Engaged
  • Push the ground away from you as you drive up through your heels
  • Squeeze your Buttocks tight at the top

Here’s a Tutorial of the Squat & Press from my GB Challenge Series:

I would recommend that you start my perfecting the Squat holding the Kettlebell with both hands and then progress to one hand and then finally to the Squat and Press as demonstrated in the video above.

# 3 – Kettlebell Lunge

Just like the Swing and the Squat the Lunge is a fundamental movement that utilises most muscles in the body. Can you see a theme taking place here? Kettlebells are effective if you use the exercises that utilises the correct movement patterns along with the largest amount of muscle recruitment.

The Lunge requires more neurological involvement that the other 2 exercises. You need good balance and core stabilisation to prevent you from losing your balance.

Similar to the Squat the Kettlebell can be held either in one hand or by both hands. One hand will be more challenging and add an extra dimension of stabilisation to the exercise.

Here are my tips on performing the Reverse Lunge:

  • Step back with confidence, feet shoulder width apart
  • Keep your core tight to stabilise the pelvis and prevent wobble
  • Aim to kiss your back knee to the floor
  • Give yourself room by taking a good step back but not so far that it becomes a stretch
  • Pull yourself back up from your front heel
  • Keep your Chest lifted throughout the movement

Here’s a Video of the Reverse Lunge from my GB Challenge Series:

The Lunge can be performed Forwards, Backwards, Sideways and Diagonally. I recommend that you start with the reverse lunge first. It’s the easiest Lunge to control while holding a Kettlebell.

Dynamic Kettlebell Workout Plan

Now you have 3 new exercises that you can add to your workouts. Dynamic Kettlebell Exercises are much more challenging so we have to be careful with recovery times. Here is a monthly workout plan for you to try:

Week 1 – Acclimatisation

  • Monday: Two Handed Kettlebell Swing – 20 secs / 30 secs rest x 3
  • Tuesday: Two Handed Kettlebell Reverse Lunge – 30 secs / 30 secs rest x 3
  • Wednesday: Rest
  • Thursday: Two Handed Kettlebell Swing – 20 secs / 30 secs rest x 3
  • Friday: Two Handed Kettlebell Squat – 30 secs / 30 secs rest x 3
  • Saturday: Rest
  • Sunday: Rest

Week 2 – Beginner

  • Monday:Two Handed Kettlebell Swing – 20 secs / 30 secs rest x 4
  • Tuesday:Two Handed Kettlebell Reverse Lunge – 30 secs / 30 secs rest x 3
  • Wednesday:Two Handed Kettlebell Squat – 30 secs / 30 secs rest x 4
  • Thursday: Rest
  • Friday: Two Handed Kettlebell Swing – 20 secs / 30 secs rest x 4
  • Followed By:Two Handed Kettlebell Reverse Lunge – 30 secs / 30 secs rest x 3
  • Saturday: Rest
  • Sunday: Rest

Week 3 – Progressive

  • Monday:Two Handed Kettlebell Swing – 30 secs / 30 secs rest x 3
  • Tuesday:Two Handed Kettlebell Swing – 30 secs / 30 secs rest x 3
  • Followed By:Two Handed Kettlebell Reverse Lunge – 30 secs / 30 secs rest x 3
  • Wednesday: Rest
  • Thursday:Two Handed Kettlebell Swing – 30 secs / 30 secs rest x 4
  • Followed By: Two Handed Kettlebell Squat – 30 secs / 30 secs rest x 3
  • Friday: Rest
  • Saturday:Two Handed Kettlebell Swing – 30 secs / 30 secs rest x 4
  • Follow With:Two Handed Kettlebell Reverse Lunge – 30 secs / 30 secs rest x 3
  • Sunday: Rest

Week 4 – Adding Get Ups

  • Monday:Two Handed Kettlebell Swing – 30 secs / 20 secs rest x 4
  • Follow With:Turkish Get Up (With Kettlebell) – 3 reps each side x 2 sets
  • Tuesday: Rest
  • Wednesday:Two Handed Kettlebell Swing – 30 secs / 20 secs rest x 4
  • Follow With:Two Handed Kettlebell Reverse Lunge – 30 secs / 30 secs rest x 3
  • Thursday:Turkish Get Up (With Kettlebell) – 5 reps each side x 2 sets
  • Friday:Two Handed Kettlebell Swing – 30 secs / 20 secs rest x 5
  • Saturday:Two Handed Kettlebell Squat – 30 secs / 20 secs rest x 4
  • Sunday: Rest

You will notice that all Kettlebell exercises above are Two Handed. I recommend this format for the first 4 weeks. As your movement and strength improves then you can move onto single handed exercises.

I’ve kept the format very simple. Again, don’t be too impatient stick to the program, you are using a lot of muscle mass during each workout so don’t overdo it. If you find that the workout is too much then either reduce the time, increase the rest or reduce the amount of sets.

Most of all practice the movements and perfect your technique.

Advanced Kettlebell Exercises – Level 3

Even if you only practiced and used those 5 exercises that I have described you could get fitter, stronger and move better than 99% of the gym population. But there is more, a lot more that you can learn.

Here are 3 more exercises that you can add to your Kettlebell Toolkit to really supercharge your workouts when you are ready:

# 1 – Kettlebell Clean

This is the next progression on from the Kettlebell Swing. Once you have mastered both the Single Handed Swing and the Double Handed Swing, Squat and Lunge then this should be next on your list.

The Clean takes the Kettlebell from the floor and places it into the racked position in the ‘V’ of your arm. From this position you then have the option to Press the Kettlebell, Squat, or Lunge.

Of all the Kettlebell Exercise this is the most technical for some and many end up with bruised wrists or forearms.

Using the correct shaped kettlebell and keeping the bell close to the body will certainly help improve your skill.

Here is a Tutorial of the Clean & Press from my GB Challenge Series:

Practice the Clean without the Press first and when you feel comfortable you can add the press to the top of the movement.

# 2 – Kettlebell High Pull

Once you have mastered the Clean you can practice the High Pull. The High Pull is very difficult for some to master, you need good wrist strength and confidence in your movement skills. Start off light and move up.

The High Pull is hugely Cardiovascular more so than any other Kettlebell exercise. Plus as you tire your technique becomes even harder to maintain. Again start slow and build up.

Here’s a High Pull Tutorial from my GB Challenge Series:

# 3 – Kettlebell Snatch

Finally we are into the Kettlebell Snatch. Hugely dynamic and requiring a lot of confidence in your own strength and skill as the kettlebell is thrown overhead. Start light and practice.

The Snatch uses most muscles in the body and puts great demands on your shoulder stability, core strength, and explosive power. This exercise is definitely for advanced athletes only!

Here’s another Video of the Snatch taken from my GB Challenge Series:

Once you have practiced all these more advanced exercises then you can put them together into a workout. Here is a small sampling for you to try…

3 Advanced Kettlebell Circuits

Workout 1

Do not put down the kettlebell during this workout. Feel the flow as you move from one exercise to the next. Only rest at the end of the circuit.

  • Swing Left – 30 secs
  • Swing Right – 30 secs
  • Clean Left – 30 secs
  • Clean Right – 30 secs
  • Reverse Lunge Left – 30 secs
  • Reverse Lunge Right – 30 secs
  • Squat and Press Left – 30 secs
  • Squat and Press Right – 30 secs
  • Rest 60 seconds / Repeat for a Total of 3 Circuits

Workout 2

As with Workout 1 try not to put the Kettlebell down between exercises. Keep pushing. This is a tough sequence, that will challenge your grip strength too!

  • Swing Left – 30 secs
  • Swing Right – 30 secs
  • High Pull Left – 30 secs
  • High Pull Right – 30 secs
  • Snatch Left – 30 secs
  • Snatch Right – 30 secs
  • Reverse Lunge & Press Left – 30 secs
  • Reverse Lunge & Press Right – 30 secs
  • Rest 60 seconds / Repeat for a Total of 3 Circuits

Workout 3

For this workout we are working more on endurance, see how you get on especially when you encounter 60 seconds of High Pulls at the end..very tough! Run through this circuit only once.

  • Swing Left – 60 secs
  • Swing Right – 60 secs
  • Rest 30 secs
  • Clean & Press Left – 60 secs
  • Clean & Press Right – 60 secs
  • Rest 30 secs
  • Snatch Left – 60 secs
  • Snatch Right – 60 secs
  • Rest 30 secs
  • Squat & Press Left – 60 secs
  • Squat & Press Right – 60 secs
  • Rest 30 secs
  • High Pulls Left – 60 secs
  • High Pulls Right – 60 secs

Conclusions

OK, that should be enough to keep you going for a while. Remember to start at the beginning and improve your stabilisation muscles first before moving on. Once you have mastered the Turkish Get Up and Single Leg Deadlift then you can start on the more Dynamic exercises like the Swing. Finally as you hone your skills and your body adapts progress onto more advanced exercises like the Clean, High Pulls and Snatch.

Enjoy your Kettlebell Training and please be safe!

Want a 12 Week Kettlebell Workout Program?

See my: 12 Week Essential Kettlebell Program

See my: 12 Week Advanced Kettlebell Program

You may also like: 125 Kettlebell Workouts

 

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Comments

  1. Erik Petersen says

    Anything double bell rocks! Also, chains (single or double), swing, high-pull, snatch, push press, jerk for 3-5 reps on the minute for 10-20 total minutes/rounds. A good grinder is TGU+windmill+overhead squat combination alternating left/right for 10-20 minutes. Double ladders clean and squat going from 1-10 reps, clean, squat, clean clean squat squat, etc up to 10 without stoping gives you 55 reps of both (easy until you get up to about 7). Simple=long cycle clean and jerk for 10 or so working minutes is great to feel strong and not overly spent. Short and sweet, Northern Michigan style leaves plenty of time to walk the pups! ‘Bells are the best and you are correct in stating that most people abuse them and either injure themselves or only scratch the surface of their potential and get little out of them. It’s nice to see my 50 something ladies swing the hell out of 50-70 pound bells knowing that when they started the 8-12 kg were intimidating! Happy Holiday’s:)

    • says

      Cheers Erik,some great suggestions there although doubles can be too advanced for many kettlebellers. Are in in Traverse City? Do you have a gym there? If so I’ll look you up next time I’m travelling up that way. Merry Christmas to you and your family.

  2. Sean Giles says

    Hi Greg,

    I am going to try this regime from the beginning. I think the hardest part will be sticking out the Turkish get-ups and single leg dead lifts, but I’ll try!
    I have had a kettle bell in the garage for months! Its about time I got in touch with my inner Russian!

    Thanks Greg,
    Sean

      • Sean says

        Hi Greg,

        Thanks for the reply. I started this this morning so will let you know how I get on. I was wondering, should I supplement this with another workout/exercise e.g. running or body weight training?

        Also, I am going to take part in the Tough Mudder event in September this year (http://toughmudder.co.uk/). I was wondering if you have ever done anything on this or had any training tips?

        Thanks,
        Sean

  3. Erik Petersen says

    Yes, Traverse City and am part of a small group training facility owned by my brother as well as a new corporate insurance company gym (Hagerty insurance) that he manages. Let me know when you are coming back to Michigan! Merry Christmas!

  4. Raoulene Polillo says

    Hi Greg. Excellent article! Are your ’25 favorite kettle bell workouts’ still available on your member site? I haven’t been on in awhile and having a bit of trouble navigating around.

  5. Greg says

    Great article. Love the clear cut instructions.

    I was planning to install the Android app for this, too, but the requirement to allow it to read/access my phone’s calls and status put me off. Any reason why it should be necessary for the app to see who I’ve called and who I’m calling at present?

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